Good health and well-being We have made great progress against several leading causes of death and disease. Life expectancy has increased dramatically; infant and maternal mortality rates have declined, we’ve turned the tide on HIV and malaria deaths have halved.Good health is essential to sustainable development and the 2030 Agenda reflects the complexity and interconnectedness of the two. It takes into account widening economic and social inequalities, rapid urbanization, threats to the climate and the environment, the continuing burden of HIV and other infectious diseases, and emerging challenges such as noncommunicable diseases. Universal health coverage will be integral to achieving SDG 3, ending poverty and reducing inequalities. Emerging global health priorities not explicitly included in the SDGs, including antimicrobial resistance, also demand action.But the world is off-track to achieve the health-related SDGs. Progress has been uneven, both between and within countries. There’s a 31-year gap between the countries with the shortest and longest life expectancies. And while some countries have made impressive gains, national averages hide that many are being left behind. Multisectoral, rights-based and gender-sensitive approaches are essential to address inequalities and to build good health for all.Facts and figures400 millionAt least 400 million people have no basic healthcare, and 40 percent lack social protection.1.6 billionMore than 1.6 billion people live in fragile settings where protracted crises, combined with weak national capacity to deliver basic health services, present a significant challenge to global health.15 millionBy the end of 2017, 21.7 million people living with HIV were receiving antiretroviral therapy. Yet more than 15 million people are still waiting for treatment.2 secondsEvery 2 seconds someone aged 30 to 70 years dies prematurely from noncommunicable diseases – cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease, diabetes or cancer.7 million7 million people die every year from exposure to fine particles in polluted air.1 in 3More than one of every three women have experienced either physical or sexual violence at some point in their life resulting in both short- and long-term consequences for their physical, mental, and sexual and reproductive health.VIEW GOAL TARGETSGoals in actionSDG 3 SDG 10 SDG 17″WE ARE A FORGOTTEN POPULATION.”Local organizations in Panama have continued to reach vulnerable groups during lockdown.more ›SDG 3 SDG 8 SDG 17CLEANING UP WHILE WAITING FOR TOURISTS TO RETURNA world famous diving destination in Thailand receives help.more ›SDG 3 SDG 15NEPAL BEGINS A GREEN RECOVERYWhile the coronavirus has shaken the whole of humanity, in Nepal it has also spurred new thinking about recovery.more ›SDG 1 SDG 2 SDG 3 SDG 5 SDG 8 SDG 10 SDG 11 SDG 13 SDG 15 SDG 17FRESH LOCAL FOOD IN BOTSWANA: “WE ARE READY TO MEET THIS DEMAND.”Farmers adopt new techniques to weather climate change.more ›SDG 3 SDG 5 SDG 10 SDG 17A NEW FUTURE FOR HEALTHRising to the challenges and opportunities of a once-in-a-century pandemicmore ›SDG 3 SDG 10 SDG 11 SDG 17MOZAMBIQUE CITY SUFFERS FROM COAL POLLUTIONAn open pit mine near a residential neighbourhood has adverse health consequences.more ›SDG 3COVID-19 IN KARBALA: THE FACES OF THE FRONTLINE RESPONSECoupled with already high unemployment the impact of the pandemic on the social and economic stability of Iraq is critical.more ›SDG 3 SDG 10CONTINUING VITAL HEALTH SERVICES IN GUINEA-BISSAU DURING COVID-19As lockdowns, curfews and transport disruptions prevent many from getting healthcare, communities are stepping into the breach.more ›SDG 3 SDG 5 SDG 7 SDG 10 SDG 11 SDG 17UNDP POWERS HEALTH CLINICS IN CHADSolar panels enable better care and healthier communities.more ›SDG logoOur focusExploreMoreOperationsSign up for monthly highlightsEnter email address© 2020 United Nations Development ProgrammeReport fraud, abuse, misconductSubmit social or environmental complaintScam alertTerms of useUNDP logoUnited Nations Development ProgrammeGoal 3: Good health and well-beingWe have made great progress against several leading causes of death and disease. Life expectancy has increased dramatically; infant and maternal mortality rates have declined, we’ve turned the tide on HIV and malaria deaths have halved.Good health is essential to sustainable development and the 2030 Agenda reflects the complexity and interconnectedness of the two. It takes into account widening economic and social inequalities, rapid urbanization, threats to the climate and the environment, the continuing burden of HIV and other infectious diseases, and emerging challenges such as noncommunicable diseases. Universal health coverage will be integral to achieving SDG 3, ending poverty and reducing inequalities. Emerging global health priorities not explicitly included in the SDGs, including antimicrobial resistance, also demand action.But the world is off-track to achieve the health-related SDGs. Progress has been uneven, both between and within countries. There’s a 31-year gap between the countries with the shortest and longest life expectancies. And while some countries have made impressive gains, national averages hide that many are being left behind. Multisectoral, rights-based and gender-sensitive approaches are essential to address inequalities and to build good health for all.Facts and figures400 millionAt least 400 million people have no basic healthcare, and 40 percent lack social protection.1.6 billionMore than 1.6 billion people live in fragile settings where protracted crises, combined with weak national capacity to deliver basic health services, present a significant challenge to global health.15 millionBy the end of 2017, 21.7 million people living with HIV were receiving antiretroviral therapy. Yet more than 15 million people are still waiting for treatment.2 secondsEvery 2 seconds someone aged 30 to 70 years dies prematurely from noncommunicable diseases – cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease, diabetes or cancer.7 million7 million people die every year from exposure to fine particles in polluted air.1 in 3More than one of every three women have experienced either physical or sexual violence at some point in their life resulting in both short- and long-term consequences for their physical, mental, and sexual and reproductive health.

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